Comparison of Actual with Estimated Weight and Height in Children with Sickle Cell Anaemia in Lagos, Nigeria
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Keywords

Body mass index,
Estimated,
Height,
Measured,
Weight

How to Cite

Akodu, S., Adekanmbi, A., & Ogunlesi, A. (2019). Comparison of Actual with Estimated Weight and Height in Children with Sickle Cell Anaemia in Lagos, Nigeria. Journal of BioMedical Research and Clinical Practice, 2(4), 185-190. Retrieved from http://www.jbrcp.net/index.php/jbrcp/article/view/126

Abstract

Sickle cell disorders are the most common genetic disorders worldwide as well as in Nigeria. The weight and height are the most used anthropometric measurements in paediatric practice for the calculation of many parameters. The objective is to determine the reliability of weight and height estimates among children with sickle cell anaemia compared with measured weight and height. A random sample of SCA children aged eight months to 12 years was studied. Height and weight were measured using standard methods, while BMI was estimated using kg/m2. These were compared with estimated weight, height and BMI. Five subjects were adjudged obese using estimated BMI: three of these five subjects were identified as obese using actual BMI. Regression analysis showed that there appears to be more positive linear relationship for weight and length/height among children aged 1– 6 years. The measured mean weight and BMI were significantly lower than the estimated mean values. The overall mean of estimated length/height did not differ significantly from overall mean of the actual length/height. In comparison with the actual BMI, the estimated BMI did not identify any of the subjects with either thinness or overweight while children with obesity were over-estimated. The formula methods of estimating weights and heights for the various ages in children with sickle cell anaemia are over-estimating their actual values; this is more obvious for weight.

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